Friday, April 30, 2010

Your Thoughts Sought on NY Times Article



So as not to influence your thinking on a New York Times Magazine piece, to be published Sunday, here it is without comment. I would love to have your impressions.

7 comments:

GrannyKass said...

It sounds to me like the author and sources are not the kind of people I'd like to associate with. They fall into: You can't please all of the people. . .

I'll continue to mail my thank you's and know that I have done the right thing by stating my appriciation for the effort a host/hostess went to in order to "give" something of themselves to me.

A pure sign of appriciation.

Wordherder said...

I think you've got a group of New Yorkers here who just need to get some f*&^%ing therapy. Seriously. Expressing gratitude is a way of putting pressure and stress on someone! Please! I can easily remove that stress by making sure I never give you or do for you anything that would require an expression of gratitude. And for the person who can't wait to get a thank you note in the mail, take some Valium! Seriously. Take some pills, lady. Are you really that important that your affirmation is meaningless unless it comes within 24 groveling hours complete with unnecessary gossip and back-biting about the folks who came to your party? And do any of your back-biting buddies ever stop to think what you're saying about THEM on the phone calls from your other butt-kissing guests? Ah, what a bunch of self-absorbed navel-gazing bunch of nut jobs.

Moose said...

My mom is a "thank you" card type of gal...so there!
Tail Wags,
~moose

Jessica said...

Thank you for posting a link to this horrifying article. What is wrong with these people? The only thing I agreed with is that a thank by way of facebook does not count. The complaints and judgments were awful. These spring to mind first: Thank you notes take to long to receive. I don't like chocolate or flowers as a hostess gift-- bring me wine. You dared to bring me a gift and now I have to write a thank you note. It makes me think of something we tell our toddlers: you get what you get and you don't get upset. A handwritten and sincere thank you note will always please me.

Hope said...

Um, let's see...thank-notes take too long to receive, and even when they do arrive we don't know if they are sincere, so let's chuck the whole practice out the window. I think it should be the beginning of a new "thankless" revolution. Please and thank taught to our children? (Passe-forget about it). Isn't it bad enough that folks don't think twice about sending mass email thank-yous, or putting you on hold while they take another call on their cell phone, we now see no point in the thank-you note?

I agree with all the previous posters! WHO ARE THESE PEOPLE??!!!I'm sure that they see themselves as the arbiters of good taste but mostly they are just scary ingrates.

THANK-YOU, Peter and Crane stationery for continuing to add a touch of grace, class, and sincerity to our everyday lives. Much appreciated.

Weims319 said...

That article was terrible. And as someone who really takes a lot of pleasure in writing a thank you note (and someone who is really p/o'd when I don't receive a written one), I'm really offended by that article. What is wrong with people?

Dave said...

I had no idea etiquette was the sole domain of women as the writer seems to imply - "what man is ever expected to write a note and send it?"

As a dedicated note writer, who happens to be male, I'm saddened by the surly attitudes described in the article.

Civility and manners are hallmarks of a modern society. At the risk of being considered trite or pretentious, I'll continue to acknowledge the generosity of others with ink on good old-fashioned Crane cotton.